Martin Humphries
LAB

News and Events


29 June 2011
Last chance to vote for our website!

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Our lab website — designed, built and maintained by members of the Martin Humphries Lab — is a finalist for a 2011 Labby Multimedia Award from The Scientist magazine. The public vote closes at the end of June, so please cast your vote here!





24 June 2011
Presentation at EMBO Cancer Proteomics meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Adam Byron was selected to present a talk at the EMBO Cancer Proteomics meeting in Dublin, Ireland. The meeting, entitled “Systems Biology, Developmental Models & Data Integration”, was the second event in the EMBO Conference Series on Cancer Proteomics. (See Adam's website for further details.)





18 June 2011
Lab website shortlisted for multimedia award

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Our lab website has been shortlisted for a 2011 Labby Multimedia Award from The Scientist magazine.

  • The Award highlights the best scientific website presenting research to the wider world, and we are very excited to be a finalist. There is a public vote, too, and can cast your vote here!





27 May 2011
Presentation at Cell Migration Consortium meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Martin has been at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA to present a talk at the Cell Migration Consortium meeting entitled “Frontiers in Cell Migration & Mechanotransduction”.





15 May 2011
Paper published in Journal of Cell Science

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Shweta Tiwari's paper on integrin activation during trafficking has been published in this week's issue of Journal of Cell Science.

  • Citation

  • S Tiwari, JA Askari, MJ Humphries and NJ Bulleid (2011) Divalent cations regulate the folding and activation status of integrins during their intracellular trafficking. J. Cell Sci. 124: 1672-80. Full text | PubMed entry





7 May 2011
Presentation at Gordon Research Conference

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab





30 April 2011
Presentation at BSCB/BSDB Spring Meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab





27 April 2011
Analysing the anatomy of adhesions

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Adam Byron's commentary on the architecture of integrin adhesion sites has been published in this week's issue of Science Signaling. This Focus Issue of Science Signaling highlights processes in cell signalling that enable cells to move efficiently and appropriately. Adam has discussed this article on his website.





06 April 2011
Presentation at University of Cardiff

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Martin has presented a talk at the School of Biosciences, University of Cardiff, on insights from mass spectrometric analyses of adhesion signalling.





5 April 2011
Presentation published in Science Signaling

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Adam Byron's Presentation on the proteomic analysis of integrin complexes has been published in this week's issue of Science Signaling. There is an accompanying slideshow of the presentation.

  • Adam has written about this presentation on his website. Full text and reprints of the Presentation are avilable on our lab Publications page

  • Citation

  • A Byron, JD Humphries, MD Bass, D Knight and MJ Humphries (2011) Proteomic analysis of integrin adhesion complexes. Sci. Signal. 4: pt2. Full text | PubMed entry





28 March 2011
Presentation at renal cell meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Rachel Lennon has presented a talk at the European Renal Cell Study Group.





16 March 2011
Talk to high-school students

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Martin gave a talk to around 80 high-school students at Bramhall High School.





8 March 2011
Presentation at Making Connections Symposium

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab





16 February 2011
Science Signaling cover art

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • This week's issue of Science Signaling features an image that Adam Byron designed for its cover. Adam's cover image is based on data from the proteomic analysis of integrin adhesion complexes, which we published previously in Science Signaling.





15 February 2011
Lab visit

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Adam Byron spent two weeks working at the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, in the lab of Professor Roman Zubarev, who is an expert in mass spectrometry. The visit was a result of a Career Development Award, which Adam received from the University of Manchester Faculty of Life Sciences.





22 December 2010
Primer published in Current Biology

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Our Primer on adhesion signalling complexes has been published in the current issue of Current Biology.

  • The article provides an accessible overview of the role of extracellular-matrix receptors and their associated protein complexes and signalling networks in the control of cell adhesion and migration. We focus on the molecular complexity of adhesion signalling complexes and mechanisms of their regulation, which impacts on many aspects of cell behaviour in health and disease.

  • Citation

  • A Byron, MR Morgan and MJ Humphries (2010) Adhesion signalling complexes. Curr. Biol. 20: R1063-7. Full text | PubMed entry





7 September 2010
Presentation at BSMB Autumn Meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Adam Byron has won the 2010 Young Investigator Award from the British Society for Matrix Biology (BSMB), and he presented the Young Investigator Award lecture at the BSMB Autumn Meeting in Norwich. Adam has written about this talk and his award on his website.





16 July 2010
Presentation at BSPR/EBI Protemics Meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab





20 April 2010
Presentation at ProteoMMX meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Adam Byron was selected to present a talk at the ProteoMMX meeting, Chester. The meeting, entitled “Strictly Quantitative”, covered all aspects of quantitative proteomics and was organised by Rob Beynon (University of Liverpool) and Simon Hubbard (University of Manchester).

  • Adam has written about this talk on his website.





13 April 2010
Wellcome Trust Centre retreat

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Most of the lab enjoyed two days in Kendal, Cumbria, for the Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research retreat. A combination of scientific talks, Centre-wide discussions, social activities and some glorious Lake District weather resulted in a very successful retreat.

  • Several lab members presented posters at the poster sessions, Nikki helped organise a quiz and games, Janet headed up a debate on cell culture and Adam gave an overview of proteomics activity in the Centre.





30 March 2010
Presentation at BSMB meeting

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab


  • Mark Morgan was selected to present a talk at the Spring 2010 BSMB meeting, Hulme Hall, Manchester. The meeting, entitled “Vascular Matrix in Health & Disease”, was organised by Ann Canfield with Anna Fildes (University of Manchester).

  • Mark spoke in the BSMB Open Session about his work on the regulation of integrin trafficking and focal adhesion dynamics by syndecan-4 phosphorylation.

  • Martin also chaired the Stem Cells & Vascular Regeneration Session, which saw Gill Murphy (University of Cambridge) give her BSMB Fell Muir Award lecture.





22 March 2010
Paper published in Journal of Cell Biology

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Work by Janet Askari and others has been published in today's issue of Journal of Cell Biology.

  • The activation state of integrin adhesion receptors is specified by global conformational changes from bent (inactive) to extended (active or primed) forms. Thus far, information used to build these models has been restricted to nonadherent cells, and the details of receptor extension in vivo are unclear. This study demonstrates that major structural rearrangements of β1-integrin subunits occur in adherent cells. Furthermore, ligand binding and integrin clustering in focal adhesions results in integrin extension and leg-domain separation.

  • The paper was originally published online as a Journal of Cell Biology Early Release Article on 15 March 2010.

  • Citation

  • JA Askari, CJ Tynan, SE Webb, ML Martin-Fernandez, C Ballestrem and MJ Humphries (2010) Focal adhesions are sites of integrin extension. J. Cell Biol. 188: 891-903. Full text | PubMed entry





7 February 2010
Humphries Lab on Twitter

Posted by Adam Byron


  • You can now follow updates from the Humphries Lab on Twitter. Our tweets will provide news and updates from our lab. (The initials of the author will be appended to each tweet.) Our Twitter feed is also integrated into the lab website – you can find it in the Lab Updates column on the left of each webpage.





18 January 2010
Angélique Millon-Frémillon joins the lab

Posted by Adam Byron


  • We welcome Angélique Millon-Frémillon to the lab. Not even some of the worst snow of the past half century could prevent Angélique's arrival in Manchester! She joins us as a postdoc from Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble, France, and will be working on the analysis of integrin adhesion complexes.





5 January 2010
Paper nominated for 2009 Signaling Breakthrough of the Year

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Our recent Science Signaling Research Article is featured in Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year published in the current issue of Science Signaling.

  • The Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year Editorial Guide is an annual feature that shortlists the most important cell signalling advances of the previous year. Science Signaling Chief Scientific Editor Michael Yaffe (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA) highlighted our proteomic analysis of integrin signalling complexes as a notable contribution to the development of methodologies that enable network-level analyses of signal transduction, an important theme of this year's selected signalling breakthroughs.





18 December 2009
Lab Christmas meal

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Members of the lab celebrated the impending winter break and enjoyed a festive Christmas meal in Restaurant Bar & Grill, Manchester, on Friday. This was followed by the traditional Lab Secret Santa, which involved the exchange of some imaginative and somewhat interesting gifts over a mulled wine.

  • Photos of the frivolities will be posted in the Lab pictures gallery soon.





3 December 2009
“Omics Meets Cell Biology” Meeting Report

Posted by Martin Humphries Lab





15 November 2009
Review published in Journal of Cell Science

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Our review on anti-integrin antibodies has been published in today's issue of Journal of Cell Science.

  • The Cell Science at a Glance article provides an overview of the mechanisms of antibody regulation of integrin adhesion receptors. The accompanying poster catalogues the best-characterised examples of function-regulating and non-functional antibodies. This review provides a resource for researchers to assess key reagents used in the study of integrin-mediated cell adhesion.

  • Citation

  • A Byron, JD Humphries, JA Askari, SE Craig, AP Mould and MJ Humphries (2009) Anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies. J. Cell Sci. 122: 4009-11. Full text | PubMed entry





11 November 2009
Paper published in Biochemical Journal

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Work by Paul Mould and others has been published in today's issue of Biochemical Journal.

  • This study shows that zebrafish α5 integrins do not bind human fibronectin or human α5β1 antagonists, the latter of which have therapeutic potential as anti-angiogenic agents in cancer and diseases of the eye. Exploiting the ligand-binding features of zebrafish α5 integrin, a gain-of-function mutagenesis approach was used to identify the regions of the α5 subunit required for interactions with human fibronectin ligand or human α5β1 antagonists. These results will aid the development of more potent α5β1 antagonists and of in vivo models suitable for drug screening or discovery.

  • The article was selected by the journal editors as this issue's Spotlight paper for the BJ Signal knowledge environment.

  • The paper was originally published online as a Biochemical Journal Immediate Publication on 14 September 2009.

  • Citation

  • AP Mould, EJ Koper, A Byron, G Zahn and MJ Humphries (2009) Mapping the ligand-binding pocket of integrin α5β1 using a gain-of-function approach. Biochem. J. 424: 179-89. Full text | PubMed entry





8 October 2009
Recent work featured in university magazine

Posted by Adam Byron


  • The October issue of UniLife, the University of Manchester's monthly magazine, features an article reporting our recent Science Signaling Research Article.

  • UniLife aims to highlight the progress the University is making towards achieving its ambitious 2015 vision.





25 September 2009
Perspective on Science Signaling paper

Posted by Adam Byron





9 September 2009
Paper published in Science Signaling

Posted by Adam Byron


  • Our paper has been published in this week's issue of Science Signaling.

  • Our work describes a methodology for the isolation and proteomic analysis of ligand-induced integrin adhesion complexes. Using this approach, we identified regulator of chromosome condensation 2 (RCC2) as a component of fibronectin-activated integrin signalling pathways that regulate cell migration.

  • There is an associated research summary written by the editors of the journal.

  • The paper is featured on the cover of the journal using an image that Adam Byron designed based on our data.

  • Citation

  • JD Humphries*, A Byron*, MD Bass, SE Craig, JW Pinney, D Knight and MJ Humphries (2009) Proteomic analysis of integrin-associated complexes identifies RCC2 as a dual regulator of Rac1 and Arf6. Sci. Signal. 2: ra51. Full text | PubMed entry





8 September 2009
Press release issued

Posted by Adam Byron


  • A press release has been issued in advance of publication of our paper in Science Signaling.

  • The way the cells in our bodies communicate with each other and their environment is of fundamental importance to human biology. This complex process of cellular crosstalk, or signalling, must be precisely controlled. When signalling goes wrong, it can lead to disease. We have developed a technique to examine how receptors on the surface of cells pass information to the hundreds of proteins inside the cell that form the signalling machinery. Uniquely, our findings enable scientists to look at the hundreds of components of cell signalling at the same time. This will provide a completely new insight into how our bodies work and opens up new avenues for drug development and testing.





*These authors contributed equally to this work.